Age Discrimination – What’s Being Done?

We all know that although age discrimination in employment situations is illegal, it still happens. It’s just very hard to prove and usually not worth the stressful effort that would be required to try. If you haven’t yet reached the point in your life where you’re concerned about ageism, consider yourself lucky; however, it might be a good idea to begin preparing yourself to counteract it if or when you do encounter it in your career.

According to an article by Michelle Rafter, “Employers Embrace Age-Diversity Initiatives,” a study from Boston College’s Sloan Center on Aging and Work has determined that “U.S. employers have done a good job of expanding their diversity programs over the past two decades, but too few take age into account….” A “brain drain” prevention program at Cornell University called Encore Cornell shows how one major organization has started taking action to address the problem of a potentially huge reduction in the organization’s knowledge base caused by massive retirement of its employees.

The article indicates that the study also found that “the most successful programs address the needs of all age groups, promote training and flexible work schedules for everyone, and help boomers, Gen X and Gen Y better work together….”

Here are a few of the companies that have launched programs in recent years:

  1. GenNext: At Dell, a two-year-old group for employees under 30 called GenNext has been so successful, the computer company is considering launching a forum for workers over 40.
  2. Prime Time Partners Network: GlaxoSmithKline created a Prime Time Partners Network to help mid-career workers after one of the pharmaceutical company’s call center employees realized that there was a gap between how younger and older workers did their jobs, but no resources to help older workers improve their skills.
  3. Boomers Network: To extend its diversity program, Wells Fargo created separate Young Professionals and Boomers networks with the common goal of providing opportunities for training, career development and community service.

Job Trends You Need to Know

We all need to stay aware of what is happening or might be coming in the job market, as best we can. It’s a matter of enlightened self-interest and astute career management, for one thing. Although there are a lot of possibilities you might want to think about, some are probably more likely to arise than others and deserve special attention. That’s why I found “5 Need-to-Know Trends in Today’s Job Market” by Michelle Rafter to be particularly interesting. You can find her article here, but I’ll give you some of the high spots:

“Here are five other job market trends to be aware of, especially if you’re over 40:

1. Boomers are staying in the work force longer. People are likely to continue working longer, the EBRI study concludes, to save more for retirement, make up for investment portfolios that tanked during the recession or to retain health insurance coverage.

2. Despite a national unemployment rate of 9.1 percent, certain jobs remain unfilled due to lack of essential skills.

3. People may be working, but they’re overworked or unhappy, and many would switch jobs if they could.

4. Employees are happier with more flexible work schedules, but so far, most don’t have them.

5. More public and private employers offer telecommuting, but they still lag worker interest.”

Smart job-seekers and career-managers (and don’t we all want to fit those categories?) know they can no longer count on employers to take care of them, if they ever could. Good companies do treat their employees well, but even they don’t guarantee desirable employment indefinitely. They can’t. The best possibility you can hope for these days is long-term employment; lifetime employment is a long-gone myth. Keeping informed about trends in the job market will help you focus on what’s possible, rather than what’s not, and choose your actions accordingly.


Toxic Bosses or Toxic Coworkers

Did you know that there’s a website called MyToxicBoss.com? Or that there’s an organization called the Workplace Bullying and Trauma Institute? I didn’t until I Googled the term “toxic bosses or coworkers” and found a multitude of articles and other items related to this topic. Not only is it not a new problem, but it has obviously become a major issue for a lot of people.

If you’ve never had the misfortune to have a toxic boss or work with a toxic coworker, consider yourself blessed! I actually fall into that category, but I’ve seen plenty of people over the years (including resume writing and career coaching clients) that weren’t so lucky. Dealing with the problem takes courage, wisdom and a willingness to tap into available resources, once you’ve identified those that apply to your situation.

According to an article by Gerri Willis, a CNN/Money contributing writer, there are 5 tips you can use to make your workplace more pleasant (online, Oct. 15, 2004). These are:

1. Identify the behavior.
2. Don’t take it lying down.
3. Take notes.
4. Know when it’s too much.
5. Control your destiny.

Whether you’re in a toxic employment situation or just want to be prepared in case you encounter one in the future, checking out Willis’ article and others on the same subject could help you figure out what to do, as well as when and how to do it if the time comes that the situation becomes unbearable. To paraphrase one of my old bosses, “Life is too short to spend a chunk of it in misery.” Hint: You might start by getting your resume in shape, so it’s ready to use when you decide the time has come to see about jumping ship.


Mobile App for Job Seekers?

What helps employers doesn’t necessarily benefit job seekers, as most of us know. In fact, as often as not, whatever it is seems to actually work against job seekers, making it harder for them to rise to the top of the search pile. However, a mobile phone application called TalentBrew Mobile might eventually help job seekers, even though it’s initially directed at companies that need to manage their job listings.

The new app, launched by TMP Worldwide, is supposed to make companies’ job listings “a lot more friendly to people job-searching on a smartphone” (according to Todd Raphael of ERE.net). Not being a heavy smartphone user myself, I might find this less exciting than it would be to those who do use their smartphones extensively and who are also in active or semi-active job-search mode.

The product is so new it’s only being beta-tested by one major client, but if that proves successful or even highly promising, we’ll probably be seeing and hearing more about the app in the future. In the meantime, the jury’s still out on this one, but it’s a topic you might want to keep a watchful eye on—particularly if you’re an enthusiastic smartphone user. Being an early adopter, if you’re smart about it, can help jumpstart your job search.


“Insane” Job Searching

You’ve probably heard the definition of insanity that goes something like this: Doing the same thing in the same way, over and over, and expecting different results. When this concept is modified and applied to your job search, it becomes a real-world problem that could have major repercussions. If you’re doing the same things and expecting the same results in conditions that might be very different from what they were years ago, that’s a good example of an insane job search. You’re probably setting yourself up for disappointment and, ultimately, a failed job search.

First and foremost, if you’re using the same job search tools and techniques in 2011 as you did in 2001, even if they worked then, they might not work now. Unfortunately for job seekers, nothing stands still these days, if it ever did. The economy is different–in some cases, radically so–and the job market is almost certainly a lot different. Just as the publishing of open jobs migrated from newspaper classified ad sections to online job boards and other online resources, so does your choice of tools and techniques need to take into account the different conditions of today’s employment world and adjust accordingly. After all, modems are pretty much gone, cell phones are making phone booths almost obsolete, and typing resumes on an electric typewriter is the technology equivalent of a dinosaur.

So what should you be doing differently in your job search to make it sane? Maybe too much to touch on here, but just as an example:

    * Do your homework (intelligence-gathering) on likely companies and industries before you start blindly sending out resumes.
    * Take the initiative to establish contacts in, or connected to, companies you’d like to work for, whether they’re currently hiring or not.
    * Launch or upgrade your online presence to ensure recruiters and hiring managers can find you there (they will look), and make sure the overwhelming image is positive (no Facebook lampshade photos!).

High-Tech Job Search Tools

It’s early days yet, but a newly launched job search company called StartWire might have important implications for job seekers down the road. According to John Zappe (ERE.net), its purpose is “helping job seekers avoid the black hole and connect with a network of trusted friends and business connections for advice and job referrals.”

Whether the new company will really offer significant value for job seekers remains to be seen. Also, will it provide unique resources that aren’t already available from established companies? We don’t have enough information yet to even make a guess. However, I’m always hopeful when I hear about something that could benefit job seekers, so I’ll be interested to see what happens.

The point really is, are you staying on the watch for high-tech tools that could help in your job search or aren’t you? That’s not to say that StartWire and other companies will survive the risky start-up phase or, if they do, that you absolutely must use them to help you manage your job search, to establish or maintain contact with hiring managers, and the like. It just means that not staying alert to technology trends that could affect your actions might prevent you from conducting as successful a job search as you otherwise would. Like it or not, technology is a fact of life in the employment world today, and to some extent, we all have to get on board regarding it.


LinkedIn Recommendations–Who Needs Them?

Assuming you’re on LinkedIn (if not, why not?), what have you done about recommendations? That is, do you have several of them from former managers, colleagues, customers, etc., and are they posted in your LinkedIn profile? If not, you’re missing a bet.

Recommendations are critical to having a LinkedIn profile that’s 100% complete, and that is critical to being found on LinkedIn by employers and others you want to be found by. Recommendations (also known as testimonials) provide third-party validation of the experience and value you are communicating in your profile. When you have good ones, it’s no longer a case of just you tooting your own horn.

It’s important to note that there’s a right way and a wrong way to request recommendations. Be respectful of the time and effort you are asking people to expend on your behalf—don’t assume they don’t have anything better to do. If possible, be a little specific about what you’d appreciate receiving from them. For example, if your work on a particular project for them is something you want to highlight, let them know that. And, most importantly, remember to thank them when they provide the recommendation.

By the way, it’s likely that not everyone will respond to your request. Some people are just too busy, make it a habit of not providing recommendations, or for some other obscure reason don’t respond. Don’t take it personally. Move on to the next one. Also, keep your recommendations fresh–if the most recent one was from four years ago, people might wonder why you don’t have any newer ones.