Don’t Be a Job Search “Idiot”!

If you’ve never made any dumb or slightly silly mistakes in a job search, congratulations! On the other hand, an occasional misstep is probably not the kiss of death unless it’s seriously stupid.

Look at it this way, though: If you don’t put your best foot forward when you’re planning and conducting a job search, why should a potential employer assume that you won’t do something equally bad as an employee? To those employers, you are–in large part–the person you present to them in your job search interactions: initial contact, interview process, follow-through and follow-up, and so on.

There is no excuse I can think of for screwing up a job search because you didn’t seriously think through and put the key steps of your search into action appropriately. (Unless maybe it’s something as major as a death in the family or other traumatic event.) For instance, if you can’t at least try to put yourself in the shoes of the employers and do whatever you can to make it easy for them to consider you as a viable candidate, what makes you think they’ll want to bother doing that?

Whether the economy and job search market are good, bad or somewhere in between, you owe it to yourself and to the prospective employer (as well as anyone else your job search directly affects) to make sure you’re not behaving like a job search “idiot”! Act like a professional in all your dealings with the people you make contact with (or are contacted by). But don’t be afraid to cut loose those who are bent on wasting your time for their own benefit. You don’t owe them anything!

Because this will be my last post for a while (we’re moving across the country in less than a week), I’m not going to make it a long one. However, I do strongly encourage you to read the blog post from Nick Corcodillos (Ask the Headhunter) that prompted me to write on this topic today. You can find his post on his Ask The Headhunter blog. It’s really an eye-opener.

Here’s hoping you have a safe and happy Memorial Day weekend.


Career Promotions: Prepare-Secure-Perform

Probably not many people would reject the idea of advancing along their career path by achieving promotions. Most of us would probably consider it a good thing–a sign that we’re growing and progressing professionally, not to mention (we hope) financially.

The process involved in preparing for and securing a promotion, as well as performing in the new role after you land it, isn’t overly complicated on the face of it but can have a number of nuances and challenges, depending on your situation. While reams can be written on this subject (and have been), I’d like to share a few tips and hints that you might find useful in your pursuit of a career promotion.

Career Promotions: Preparation

  • Make sure you’re really ready to move up in your organization. It’s fine to visualize yourself in the desired role, but you need to be able to back that up with substance. Wishful thinking isn’t enough!
  • Nurture your network (internal as well as external) to garner as much support as you can for your upward move. If you don’t already have a functioning internal network, moving up will be more of an uphill battle than you want to face.
  • Understand how office politics work and ensure that you’re prepared for that. You might find those politics distasteful, but if they’re a fact of life, you’d better know how to work within or around them.

Career Promotions: Securing One

  • Once you’ve done your homework (the preparation), begin keeping an eye out for potential promotions to pursue. Listen and observe carefully to gather possibly useful information that might not be readily apparent to a casual onlooker.
  • Avoid assuming that because you’re interested in a particular promotion, the people in power will somehow know that without your needing to do anything more to communicate your interest.
  • Communicate in the appropriate way and time with influencers in your network to sound them out for advice and possible contacts with promotion decision-makers who are not in your network.

Career Promotions: Performance

Congratulations! You’ve landed that sought-after promotion, and you’re on Cloud 9!

Okay, now come back to earth for a moment. If you get a honeymoon period in the new job, it might not last very long. If the situation is time-sensitive for any reason, there might not be a honeymoon period at all. So what’s your next step?

Author Elizabeth Grace Saunders offers some good suggestions about the post-promotion phase, in her article, “3 Counterintuitive Things You Should Do After You Get a Promotion.”

  1. Define what you’re not going to do anymore. You probably need to let go of or delegate some of your former duties to take on the new ones.
  2. Depend on other people more. You need a good support team–not only inside the company but in your personal life as well–to function at peak effectiveness.
  3. Cling to your core priorities. That includes more sleep, more exercise (or maintaining what you’ve been doing), and more time for relaxing with family and friends.

P.S. On a personal note, my planned move from California to Massachusetts is in its final phase now. We’ve bought a place there and sold our place in California. The scheduled move-out date is May 23, but we won’t hit the road for our cross-country trek until May 26 to avoid the Memorial Day weekend traffic. Anticipated arrival in Massachusetts is around June 2 or 3. I will be offline for probably a few weeks around the time of the move, although I hope to have at least limited email access.


Company Loyalty–How Much Do You “Owe” Them?

The title of this post is somewhat of a trick question. When a company pays your salary, as agreed when you took the job, you probably do owe them something in return. In other words, in most cases you should deliver whatever you agreed to do in exchange for that salary.

On the other hand, what if the company expects actions that are, for example, unethical or borderline illegal? Then you’re looking at possible consequences and risks that you didn’t agree to at the outset. Such a situation merits at least some serious thought on your part and might require you to take steps that are difficult to face.

Here’s hoping you never have a job situation that puts you in that kind of spot, but we’ve probably all heard or read news reports about just such occurrences. How would you handle it if it happened to you?

Unacceptable Job Performance Demands

Ultimately, you’ll have to determine whether a demand is so unacceptable that you need to find another position. Before you reach that point, however, it would be wise to evaluate the situation carefully. For instance, can you identify possible ways to work things out so that you don’t have to accede to unacceptable job performance demands?

If you’ve done your best to work through a troublesome issue and gotten nowhere, that might be the time to start seriously looking for options outside the company–as discreetly as possible. In the meantime, you’ll want to avoid “stirring the pot” if you can, so you don’t raise a red flag in the minds of management about your plan to jump ship the moment you find a better job offer.

Among other things, be very careful about talking to anyone within the company–even someone you think you can trust. Whether or not the person is on the level and means to treat your comments as confidential, you can’t bank on that and don’t want to put your job at risk unnecessarily.

Company Loyalty Not a 2-Way Street

I’ve written about this before, but it bears repeating. As far as I know, no company gives you an open-ended job guarantee or promises you they’ll give you ample notice if they decide they need or want to dispense with your services.

Maybe the best companies today do care about their employees and make a point of treating them fairly, partly because they know it’s the best way to continue attracting top performers; but those are probably the exception rather than the rule. Many companies that aren’t necessarily shady or otherwise undesirable don’t feel a real sense of loyalty to employees. As Tom Hanks’ character says in “You’ve Got Mail”: “It’s not personal; it’s business.”

When they need to trim expenses or change directions for the business in some way that leaves you on the outside, you’re expendable. In most cases, they don’t even need to give you any warning. Not only that, but if you give them the traditional two-weeks’ notice when you’re the one initiating a separation, they can just as easily walk you right out the door with no time to do more than (maybe) grab your personal effects.

So a word to the wise: Be smart about the subject of company loyalty. Do what you knowingly agreed to do and make plans to leave if the job situation takes an unexpected turn for the worst. You “owe” that to yourself.

P.S. This will be my last blog post for the next few weeks, as I’m in the midst of getting ready to make a cross-country move. I’ll get back to you when I can.


Long-Term Unemployment Challenges

I’ve had a few clients over the years that have gotten caught up in the Never-Never Land of long-term unemployment, and to say that it’s stressful and disturbing for them is a gross understatement. While I doubt a “magic bullet” exists that will fix the problem effortlessly, I do believe some pointers and potentially hopeful signs can be found to encourage those job seekers.

Companies that Discriminate Against Long-Term Unemployed

We’ve probably all heard about companies that discriminate against people who have been out of work for months, even years. Some of that discrimination is subtle, while some of it (unbelievably, to me) is blatant. I’ve even seen job postings that specifically exclude people who’ve been unemployed for an extended period. It’s often included as “must be currently employed” or words to that effect. The justification for doing so always sounds about as lame and self-serving as it can get.

For example, some companies claim that people who’ve been out of work for an extended period might be out of date on necessary skills and be unable to perform at the level of quality the company needs. Yet those same companies are apparently willing to hire people who don’t even have some of the “necessary” skills listed on their resume, just because those individuals are currently employed! In what universe does that attitude make any sense?

To begin with, just because someone has been unemployed for, say 7 months, doesn’t mean his/her skills have somehow atrophied in the meantime and he/she is somehow therefore a below-par candidate. Also, it shouldn’t take more than a few well-chosen questions in a submission form to get an idea of whether the person’s skills would be up to the task.

Just as an example of what’s “out there” on this subject, I found the following statement in a 2012 article titled “Discrimination Against the Unemployed“: “When Scott Pelley [of CBS] and his team of producers set out to profile Joe Carbone and his Platform to Employment program, they started hearing the same complaint from people who are out of work: if you’ve been unemployed for a year or more, some companies won’t even give you an interview.”

Along the same lines, a 2013 article titled “The Unemployment Bias: The Long-term Unemployed Face Severe Discrimination” states that “Last year I did some work for a large company that decided it would not hire anyone who was unemployed. It would automatically reject any candidate who had been unemployed even for a day.” Seriously?!!!

These short-sighted and narrow-minded corporate views have so many holes in them that I can’t begin to list them all, but here’s one: If the best potential hires are happily employed already and not interested in moving, and those employers won’t even consider equally well-qualified candidates who are out of work, how are those companies going to hire ANY good employees? That being said, how long can the companies continue in business before they reach a quality and customer-satisfaction level that hits their bottom line hard?

Companies that Might Hire Long-Term Unemployed

In early 2014, an event occurred that was intended to improve the situation over the long term. An article titled “300 companies pledge to help long-term unemployed” was one of several published regarding a campaign by President Obama to encourage companies to open up opportunities for individuals affected by long-term unemployment challenges. As the article noted, “More than 300 companies—including 20 of the nation’s 50 largest, such as Apple, Wal-Mart and General Motors—have agreed to reassess their hiring practices at President Obama’s request to make sure they are not biased against Americans who have been out of work for more than six months.”

Of course, pledges to reexamine hiring practices don’t automatically translate into a visible increase in hiring long-term unemployed job seekers. I don’t know if any studies have been done over the past year to evaluate whether any measurable improvement has been happening. However, I did see the following statement in a recent job posting:

“Siemens encourages qualified long-term unemployed individuals to apply for open positions.” The particular position in the posting was for a location in Indiana, but the statement sounds as if it covers the whole corporation. This might just be an isolated instance, but at least it strikes a more hopeful note than what I’ve been seeing so far.

What can you do if you’re one of those long-term unemployed individuals? I’m hoping to do some more research and then develop a blog post that offers a constructive outlook on this subject.


Decisions, Decisions! How They Impact Your Career

Chances are good that you’ve recently made or will soon be making one or more decisions that will impact your career success, although you might not realize that if your decisions are made without looking at them from all sides first. Being clear about what you’re aiming for in terms of career results is sound advice–a good place to start. Ben Stein (an American writer, lawyer, actor and commentator) put it this way: “The first step to getting the things you want out of life is this: Decide what you want.”

Career Decision-Making Has Two Parts

The first part is to do what Stein suggested; that is, determine what your goals are–both long-term and short-term career goals matter. And be as clear as you can about what you decide you want from your career. Fuzzy thinking on this score could cause you a lot of professional and personal grief in the long run.

Look carefully at the factors that are influencing your decisions. For instance, are you attracted by the idea of a job in a career field that tends to pay big salaries and not looking so much at the price to be paid to get and keep one of those jobs? Does the apparent glamor of a particular choice generate so much excitement that you’re ready to leap into pursuing it without careful thought?

Among other considerations, ask yourself these questions:

  • What will I need to do to be competitive in this career field?
  • What are the expectations for sustained growth (plenty of opportunity) in this field, industry, etc.?
  • What demands will such a job make on my personal life, and am I reasonably sure I’m prepared to accept that?
  • What’s my Plan B if my first choice turns out to be unsatisfactory?

Career Decision-Making: After the Choice is Made

The second part of career decision-making involves actually deciding. Waffling back and forth is ineffective at best and can present you as indecisive or a “non-decider” to other people, possibly including your boss and potential future bosses. The impact such behavior can have on your career success is not pretty! Once you’ve made a decision–chosen a direction to pursue–you need to stick with it and give it your best shot if you expect it to work out well.

This is not to say that you can’t change your mind down the road a ways, if there’s a compelling reason to do so. However, that shouldn’t happen often if you’ve thought decisions through carefully beforehand and put your best effort into executing them.


Your Online Brand & Reputation Management

By now, I think most people realize that they have a brand, whether or not they pay much attention it. However, since so much information is available about you online these days, ignoring your online brand and reputation is risky at best.

How Do You Manage Your Personal Brand Online?

William Arruda is widely recognized as the guru of personal branding. A recent post by Tara Kachaturoff in Arruda’s online publication, The Personal Branding Blog, addresses the above question with some practical steps. In a nutshell (read the blog post for details), they are:

  1. Assessment: Create a benchmark from which you can measure progress.
  2. Determine what you want to change.
  3. What’s working for you?
  4. Draft a strategy that works for you!
  5. Rinse and repeat – do what works and more of it!

Think You Don’t Need to Manage Your Brand?

Think again! Whether you’re a job seeker, just managing your ongoing career or a business owner like me, you really can’t afford to ignore the need for personal brand management. The days when you could stick your head in the sand and pretend this issue doesn’t exist are long gone.

Try Googling yourself by first and last name (or your business name if you own a business) and see what comes up. Or what doesn’t, as the case might be.

At times, I’ve found references to myself in as many as 6 or 7 of the top 10 on page one of results and maybe a few more on page two. (There are several Georgia Adamsons, so I’m usually not the only listing.) Most recently, I found just 2 or 3 on the first page and 1 or 2 on the second page. Obviously, I have some work to do! (Of course, if I Google “Georgia Adamson resume writer,” I’m 10 out of 10 on page one!)

By the way, one of the references you might find when you search for yourself is your LinkedIn profile–especially if you’ve updated it recently (even a small tweak now and then will help the profile to come up high on the list). That’s just one of many reasons to make sure your LI profile is current and updated fairly often; LinkedIn does get a lot of exposure. If you want potential employers to find you and to be favorably impressed by what they find, give your LinkedIn presence the attention it deserves.

You don’t need to spend hours every day on managing your online brand and reputation, but consistent attention over time is likely to pay dividends. You’ll be more easily found and better able to make the kind of impression you want to make on the people (i.e., employers) who do find you. That’s well worth some thoughtful effort.


Is Your Resume “Old News”? Think Resume Update

It’s the start of a new year, and you probably have a list of things you need or want to do. Looking at your resume might not be one of them unless you’re on the verge of launching a serious job search. (Some people don’t do it even then, although they should!)

The fact is, any point at which you’re not in or planning a near-term job search is an excellent time to haul out your existing resume and dust off the cobwebs. For one thing, you can do it without the added pressure that a full-blown job search exerts. That means you can give careful thought to the present condition of your resume, consider what might have changed since you last updated it, and take steps to refresh it.

5 Key Points to Consider for a Resume Update

  1. How long ago did you last do a resume update? If it was less than a year, you probably don’t need a complete overhaul. However, anything new that has happened since then, particularly if it has expanded your list of accomplishments, belongs in the resume. Why wait until later to put it there?
  2. If the last update was more than a year ago, has anything significant changed that really should be taken care of? For example, if your job title or scope of responsibility is different, you could be missing a bet by not adjusting your resume accordingly. It might increase your chances of landing the next big job opportunity when the time comes.
  3. Deadwood often needs to be pruned to make a tree healthy and more attractive. The same holds true for your resume. It’s not just that you don’t want to end up with a 6-page resume (you don’t!), but also you don’t want to advertise to potential employers that you’re either stuck in the past or not interested in moving forward in your career.
  4. Even if you had a great resume 5 years ago, times have probably changed since then. The language (wording) you used back then might be considered obsolete, out of date, or otherwise “old hat.” And if you don’t know what that last phrase means, look it up :) .
  5. If you’ve moved in a new direction since your last resume update, the resume needs to reflect that new direction, including any significant changes in the nature or level of your responsibilities, as well as what you might have accomplished in that new area.

Does Your Resume Shout Value to Employers?

Well, no, your resume doesn’t exactly have to shout anything. However, it does need to make your unique value so clear that busy employers can’t possibly miss it in a quick scan–which is about all you can count on with that first look. It has to cause what I call the “eyebrow raising” moment. You know, where the employer goes, “Hey! Maybe we should talk to this person! He/she could be just what we’re looking for.”

If your existing resume doesn’t do that–whether it was last updated 5 years ago or 5 months ago, you have a different challenge: what do you need to do to make that raised-eyebrow reaction happen? For the purposes of this post, though, I suggest that you think in terms of doing a resume update that also (not coincidentally) sharpens your value-added message to employers. That way, your resume won’t be mistaken for “old news” that an employer can afford to skip over. And isn’t that what you want?


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